Quart Of Chinese Food Feeds How Many?

Quart Of Chinese Food Feeds How Many
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11-14-2013, 10:04 PM

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101 posts, read 152,212 times Reputation: 91

table> Back when I used to live in NY, we used to order a quart of chicken and broccoli, and a quart of fried rice. I’d take it back home and dole it out among the children, and you could feed everyone for ~$12. Now that I live in Austin, while there are perfectly pleasant chinese food restaurants on practically every corner, when I ask for a quart of something, they have absolutely no idea what I’m talking about. They only seem to want to let you order single servings of food, and buying five individual servings can cost quite a bit! Even during the cheapest lunch specials. To summarize, are there any (authentic) chinese food restaurants near the 78745 area that allow you to purchase in bulk? On a related note, I’m not a transplant from NY, I’m born and raised Austin. I just spend a lot of time up there visiting my father’s side of the family. I’m not sure why, but I just felt that needed to be said!

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11-15-2013, 12:03 AM

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3,836 posts, read 5,315,863 times Reputation: 2556

table> I don’t know about quarts – but the food here is cheap and really decent. It’s as close to what you can get in NYC in Austin. First Chinese BBQ Menu

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11-15-2013, 08:46 AM

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18 posts, read 23,901 times Reputation: 21

table> I have never been to a Chinese restaurant in NYC or Austin that had quart-sized portions. I have been to Asian grocery stores like Ranch 99 that have delis where you can fill up a container of food. I don’t think there are any of those in Austin though.

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11-15-2013, 09:16 AM

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Location: Richardson, TX 12,160 posts, read 20,102,445 times Reputation: 32848

table> A quart isn’t that much, really. It’s 4 cups, like those square zip-loc containers.

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11-15-2013, 11:39 AM

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7,660 posts, read 13,826,073 times Reputation: 4196

table> I think what he is saying is that the restaurants he is going to give you a single meal vs. selling it to you family style. I would think that most restaurants serve family style. I dont know of any that would serve you a single meal. edit ok I reread the post. If you are going at lunch then yes you will get a single person plate. Instead, order from the dinner menu and you will be fine. Also we always still allot one dish per person which usually ends up with 2-3x too much food.

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11-15-2013, 01:19 PM

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Location: Austin, TX 12,063 posts, read 12,377,246 times Reputation: 7232

table> I don’t know about Chinese food, but you can get quarts of BBQ at places like Rudy’s and Salt Lick and quarts of Cajun food at places like Stuffed in North Austin (best Cajun food ever). Maybe try to blend in “Austin style” and go for these bulk items?

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11-15-2013, 01:26 PM

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Location: Cedar Park/NW Austin 1,306 posts, read 2,940,168 times Reputation: 878

table> Entrees always seem to come in large quantities at the Chinese restaurants in town. No one refers to them as “quart” size though. One entree typically lasts me 3 meals at least. At many of the places I’ve tried in Austin, lunch portions are usually smaller (but I still wind up with leftovers) and part of a combo meal (with some soup and an eggroll usually). One of my favorite things to do long ago was order two entrees at Asia Cafe (one meat dish and one veggie dish) and then eat the leftovers for the rest of the week.

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11-15-2013, 02:12 PM

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Location: Central TX 2,331 posts, read 3,795,012 times Reputation: 2794

table> Quote: Originally Posted by disposable2 Quarts of Chinese food? I don’t think that restaurant you used to go to in NYC was quality nor authentic. Every Chinese place in NY offers their food in either pint or quart size. Those plastic/tin trays that are used here are usually reserved for the “chefs specialties.” Since Chinatown Westlake closed I don’t eat Chinese food anymore.

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11-16-2013, 07:53 AM

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1,058 posts, read 2,086,598 times Reputation: 1391

table> OP I would be ordering the Ala Carte items not the meals, those should be about the “quart” size you are referring to. We always order individual items then share. We never get Chinese to go we always eat in, I love Chinese but only when its really hot, fresh with crisp veggies.

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11-17-2013, 10:02 AM

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Location: Avery Ranch, Austin, TX 8,970 posts, read 16,073,596 times Reputation: 3959

table> Back when I used to live in NY, we used to order a quart of chicken and broccoli, and a quart of fried rice. I’d take it back home and dole it out among the children, and you could feed everyone for ~$12. I think the $12 for two quarts of prepared anything might be the stumbling block here More like $20, I reckon. Dang, I’m cutting down on rice, but that sure does sound good!

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How big is a quart for Chinese food?

QUART has a bottom dimension of 2-7/8 by 3-9/16 inches, a top dimension of 4-5/8 by 3-7/8 inches, and a height of 4-1/2 feet. NOTE: The length is the measurement that represents the opening into the box at its broadest point. The width of the aperture into the box is the smallest of the three dimensions.

How much rice is in a Chinese takeout container?

A Ten-Point Checklist: 1. Acquire the Knowledge Necessary to Interpret the Menu and Search for Foods That Are: Served Steamed Jum (poached) Chu (broiled) Kow (roasted) Shu (barbecued) 2. Aim for a meal that has a greater proportion of vegetables to meat, and when ordering them, request that they be stir-fried rather than battered or deep-fried (crispy means fried).

  1. There are certain vegetable recipes that do not make the cut for the “good option” category.
  2. Because eggplant tends to soak up oil, one serving of eggplant in garlic sauce includes 1000 calories, 13 grams of saturated fat, and 2000 milligrams of salt.
  3. Mu shu pork (without pancakes) has quite a few veggies in addition to having a calorie count of 1000 and a salt count of 2600.

A pancake that is 8 inches in diameter contributes around 90 calories, while a pancake that is 6 inches in diameter adds about 60 calories. A better option is chicken mu shu, which has around 5 grams less fat and approximately 200 less calories per dish.3.

Use chopsticks to eat rather than a fork since it slows down the eating process and prevents you from scooping up as much of the sauce or oil as you could with a fork.4. Do not let the fried noodles to get near your table or out of the takeaway bag since one serving of these noodles has around 180 calories, 8 grams of fat, and 420 milligrams of salt.5.

Soup, such as hot and sour, egg drop, or wonton soup, is a wonderful choice for a lower calorie meal (about 100 calories per cup), which can help you feel full; but, soups are typically filled with salt. There are 91 calories, 3 grams of fat, and 876 milligrams of sodium in one cup of hot and sour soup.6.

  • Exercise caution while working with syrupy sweet sauces such as sweet and sour.
  • Common ingredients include flour, cornstarch, sugar, and corn syrup.
  • Sometimes they may include sugar.
  • The hoison, oyster, and strong mustard are all excellent options to consider.7.
  • Eep in mind that rice has around 200 calories per cup, regardless of whether it is white or brown.

Two glasses are frequently included in a takeaway carton. One cup of chicken fried rice has 329 calories, 11.96 grams of fat, and 598 milligrams of sodium. A cup of basic fried rice, without any additives, provides around 230 calories per cup.8. Reduce your consumption of grilled spare ribs, since four of them might contain close to 600 calories.

There are 148 calories, 9.27 grams of fat, and 447 milligrams of sodium in a half piece of fried shrimp toast.9. Instead of going for the more fatty egg rolls or fried wontons, try some steamed dumplings instead. There are 220 calories, 11 grams of fat, and 412 milligrams of salt in one egg roll. A better option is a spring roll, which has around 100 calories and 300 mg of salt but has a thinner wrapper and a more manageable portion size.

There are 54 calories, 2.52 grams of fat, and 111 milligrams of salt in one meat-filled fried wonton. With only 41 calories, 0.98 grams of fat, and 161 milligrams of salt, a steamed dumpling stuffed with meat, chicken, or shellfish is likely to be the healthiest option.10.

  1. How much food are you putting on your plate, particularly if you are eating out of a takeaway container? The amount of food that is placed on your plate in a restaurant or that is sent to you when you place a takeout order is sometimes far more than what would be considered a typical portion size.
  2. It’s possible that you’re racking up a lot more calories than you realize.

Bring out your measuring cup the next time you order Chinese takeout so that you may get a general idea of the size of the quantity that you have just heaped on your plate. This will serve as a reference for future ordering. It’s possible that you’ll be astonished.

How many cups come in a quart?

What is the ratio of cups to quarts? – One quart is equivalent to four cups. Two quarts are equal to eight cups’ worth of volume. There are sixteen cups in a total of four quarts. There are 20 cups in a quart, which is the same as 5. A half-quart has a capacity of two cups.

How big is 1qt?

The volume of one US liquid quart is equivalent to 57.75 cubic inches, which is precisely 0.946352946 liters.

How big is a qt of rice?

How many ounces of white long rice are there in one US dry quart? One US dry quart of white long rice translated to ounces = 30.37 oz. One US dry quart of white long rice equals 30.37 oz. The correct response is: The corresponding measurement in ounces for one US dry quart (one quart) of white long rice is thirty-three and seventy-eight ounces, hence the conversion factor for one quart dry of white long rice is thirty-three and seventy-eight ounces.

When measuring their rice components, professionals always make sure to use the most accurate units conversion results possible, since this is the factor upon which their level of success in superb cooking rests. When it comes to baking and specialized culinary techniques, having precise weight or volume measurements of white long rice is quite necessary.

If there is a precise measurement in US dry quarts (qt dry), which is used in volume units, it is the rule in the culinary arts career to convert it into the ounces (oz) weight number of white long rice in a precise manner. If there is an exact measure in US dry quarts (qt dry), which is used in volume units, It is comparable to an insurance policy for the head chef, which ensures that each and every dish will be prepared to the highest standard.

  1. How many ounces of white long rice are there in a quart of dry rice sold in the United States? This question requires a conversion.
  2. Or, how many ounces of white long rice are there in a quart of dry US measure? Simply cut and paste the following into your browser’s address bar to create a link to this online culinary converter for white long rice – US dry quart to ounces.

The link to this resource will be labeled as follows: Culinary white long rice conversion from US dry quarts (qt dry) to ounces (oz). Link: I’ve put in a lot of effort to construct this site for you, so I’d really appreciate it if you could email me some feedback about how much you enjoyed visiting.

How many cups is a pint of Chinese food?

Table 1: Conversions, ranging from Cups to Pints, etc.

Cups Pints Quarts Gallons Ounces
1 c ½ pt ¼ qt 1/16 gal 8 oz
2 c 1 pt ½ qt ⅛ gal 16 oz
4 c 2 pt 1 qt ¼ gal 32 oz
8 c 4 pt 2 qt ½ gal 64 oz
12 c 6 pt 3 qt ¾ gal 96 oz
16 c 8 pt 4 qt 1 gal 128 oz

Conversions from cups to pints to quarts to gallons and ounces, starting with the smallest unit. Do you recall the old math graphic that we used to use in class? It was called Mr. Gallon, had a huge G with C’s, P’s, and Q’s, and simply detailed this straightforward information on gallon conversions: 2 cups Equals 1 pint 2 pints Equals 1 quart 4 quarts = 1 gallon