What Wine Goes With Chinese Food?

What Wine Goes With Chinese Food

Is white or red wine better with Chinese food?

How to Combine Wine with Chinese Food Wine and Chinese food may not be a coupling that is particularly well-known, but if you understand how to pair wines with the intricate tastes of Chinese cuisine, you’ll discover that the two can form quite the potent team.

Wine Folly recommends that customers follow certain tried-and-true principles in order to get more consistent results when combining wine with food in general. Their recommendations consist of the following: The wine should be more acidic than the food. The wine should be sweeter than the food. The wine and foods should have equivalent flavor intensities.

Red wines pair best with meats that have a strong flavor. White wines pair well with lighter meats (like fish and chicken). Balance bitter wines with fat. Match the wine to sauces rather than the meat. Note that white, sparkling, and rose wines create contrasting patterns.

Note that red wines create more harmonious couplings. When it comes to matching wines with foods, the following are not hard and fast laws that must be adhered to, but they may serve as useful jumping off places. If you prefer white wines, the China Wine Competition suggests keeping to German or Alsatian types such as Riesling, Pinot Gris, and Pinot Blanc.

If you prefer robust reds, such as New World Cabernet or Malbec, the competition suggests sticking to varietals from the New World.

What red wine goes with Chinese?

Stick to a fruitier red like a Merlot (as long as it is low in tannins), a Syrah or Syrah blend from the New World such is this excellent Chilean Syrah blend, and serve it with your meal to complement the bold flavors of Chinese cuisine.

Does Chardonnay go with Chinese food?

Noodle Dishes Crisp, unoaked Chardonnay, dry Riesling, or even sparkling wine are excellent wine choices to pair with fried noodle dishes like chow mein and fried rice.

Does Pinot Grigio go with Chinese food?

On Manhattan’s Upper West Side, there was once an affordable Chinese restaurant that thrived for many years until it was driven out of business by rents that continued to steadily increase over time. In spite of serving cuisine that was rather standard, I have no doubt that its success was attributable to the fact that it included a complimentary glass of wine with lunch and supper.

The establishment was perpetually bustling with patrons nursing drinks in their hands while they gnawed on their Mou Shu pork. It had to have been quite cheap considering that it came from gallon jugs. I gave it a shot once, and while it was terrible (the wine, that is; the Mou Shu was just good), it was certainly successful in luring new customers.

This takes us to the age-old subject of what wine to drink with Asian cuisine in general, and Chinese cuisine in particular, if your taste is a little bit more “hmmm.” more sophisticated than wine from a jug? Because the cuisine of Europe and the wine of Europe have developed at the same time over the course of millennia, they have established a natural symbiosis in which each contributes to the enhancement of the other.

  • I’m thinking of Indian curries and fiery Szechwan foods when I say this, but this is not the case in Asia, where alcohol has historically been based on grain, and some cuisines just do not go with wine.
  • These are dishes that go well with beer or whiskey.
  • But other than that, a good general rule to follow when picking a wine to pair with Asian cuisine is to adhere to the German and Alsatian varietals, such as Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Gris, and Pinot Blanc, regardless of where they are produced.

This is a solid general rule. Although Chinese cuisine is immensely varied, the recommendations given above should be followed when selecting white wines. When selecting red wines, however, you should opt for wines with loads of ripe fruit and moderate acidity, such as New World Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz/Syrah, and Malbec.

  1. Try your hand at some of these.
  2. Smooth, rich, and luscious, the Alamos Selection Malbec 2012 from Mendoza, Argentina costs twenty dollars and is an excellent choice for sweet barbecue sauce.
  3. Do not be scared to serve at a colder temperature.
  4. Alpha Estate Rosé 2014 $25 Florina, Greece A tad sweet, but don’t let this put you off as its wonderful tropical fruit make it the perfect match for lighter Chinese meals.
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Alpha Estate is located in Florina, Greece. Eroica Riesling 2013, Chateau Ste. Michelle $20 Washington State Packed with bushels of tropical fruits, it is great for all except the spiciest Chinese cuisine, and in fact, it is ideal for all foods from the nations around the South China Sea and the East China Sea.

Does Malbec go with Chinese food?

There are very few classics that go well with a heavier wine, and beef and broccoli is one of the few of those classics. Malbec is the perfect wine to pair with this dish. Because of this, the velvety Malbec is an excellent choice to drink with this meal.

Does Rose go with Chinese food?

Rosé, thanks to its smooth, fruity flavor, easy-to-drink nature, and light weight, as well as its appealing scents that are reminiscent of berries, is an excellent complement to a wide range of culinary preparations. When you are having a barbecue or other meat dishes like seared beef or smoked salmon, it is a wonderful addition to your meal to have this as an accompaniment.

Image courtesy of Lionel Moulet, donated by Inter Rh’ne. In addition, rosé is a delicious complement to tomato-based foods like pasta and pizza, as well as light and refreshing tomato salads. In addition to edamame, fried prawns, dumplings, and Chinese-style salad (freshly cut veggies seasoned with vinegar, salt, and other spices), additional delights from the orient that go well with rosé include edamame and fried prawns and dumplings.

On the other hand, spicy Chinese meals, Thai appetizers, and soft goat cheese all benefit from the addition of sparkling rosé to their wine pairings since it enhances the flavor of the cuisine’s unusual elements. Its energizing bubbles and delicious scents go particularly well with berry fruits and sweets like chocolate cakes and chocolate-coated strawberries.

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Can you drink wine with Chinese food?

Spices prepared in the style of Sichuan served with wine A glass of chilled sparkling wine, such as Prosecco, Asti, Lambrusco, or Brut Champagne, may do wonders to alleviate the burn caused by Sichuan-style spices. Once more, fragrant white wines with Chinese food may be successful when matched with meals that have complex fragrances as a result of the use of a variety of spices.

You might also choose the route of sweetness. A Riesling made in the Auslese style, or even a Sauternes or Barsac made in a milder manner, might be an excellent complement to the peppery experience. Beckett suggested either “a robust off-dry rosé (a light Provencal pink doesn’t quite cut the mustard) or an off-dry Riesling such as Jeffrey Grosset’s Alea,” both of which are examples of off-dry wines.

Red wines with a lighter body and more fruit flavor, such as a juvenile Gamay or Pinot Noir, pair nicely with the complex flavors and help to cleanse the palate. Be wary of heavy tannins and high alcohol content because these components have a tendency to amplify the heat.

Can you have red wine with Chinese food?

If Red Is Your Comfort Wine, Try a Lighter Style – Let’s say that red is your go-to wine. When purchasing the majority of Chinese cuisine, it is best to avoid selecting the red with the deepest hue. Instead, choose to take it easy! Even while Pinot Noir, Beaujolais, and other lighter red types may manage the spicy Chinese meals, they won’t be able to overpower them.

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Is Pinot Noir good with Chinese food?

Posted by Fiona Beckett (Google+) on February 11 2021 at 07:01 Inquiring as to which wine is the greatest match for Chinese food is comparable to seeking for the best match for European food; however, this does not in any way represent the variety of dishes that are prepared in Chinese restaurants.

  1. Having said that, a significant number of us are likely to have a Chinese dinner this week, either in a restaurant or as a takeout, and we are curious as to what we should drink with it.
  2. White wine is a more tempting alternative when paired with the sweet and sour flavors of many popular Chinese dishes for most westerners who do not share the Chinese veneration for red wine; nevertheless, like with other dinners, you may wish to change wines as you transition from shellfish and chicken to red meat (especially beef).

The following is a list of my top six recommendations: Sparkling wine, particularly if you are eating dim sum or other fried items. Not necessary champagne; a sparkling wine from Australia with a hint of sweetness, especially a sparkling rosé, can work just fine in its place.

Riesling, which often contains a hint of sweetness, is likely the most versatile wine to pair with the vast majority of different cuisines. It really does not make much of a difference where it originates; it might be from Alsace, Austria, Australia, New Zealand, or even the state of Washington. My Chinese New Year feast from the previous year was a huge success thanks in large part to this off-dry Clare Valley riesling.

Torrontes: I’ve been struck for a while by how well floral Argentinian Torrontes goes with spicy food. It’s a less intense alternative to gewurztraminer, which is great with certain dishes (like duck), but isn’t such a good all-rounder. Torrontes: I’ve been struck for a while by how well floral Argentinian Torrontes goes with spicy food.

Not the light and delicate Provencal kind, but rather a robust, dry, fruity rosé such as the recent trend of Portuguese rosés or the rosés from Bordeaux. Surprisingly complementary of Chinese cuisine. Pinot noir is clearly a particularly wonderful match with crispy duck pancakes, but if you pick one with a touch of sweetness, such as those from Chile, New Zealand, or California, it is also versatile enough to handle other foods as well.

A full-bodied red wine that is fruity without being too tannic; this style of wine is typical of what many Chinese people drink, particularly red Bordeaux. Personally, I would choose a shiraz-cabernet or GSM (grenache, syrah, and mourvèdre combination) wine, but I would only drink it with heartier foods, dishes including aubergine, or dishes prepared with black bean sauce.

  1. A fine cru Beaujolais such as Morgon is still another alternative to consider.
  2. See Pairing Wine with Chinese Cuisine for a more comprehensive list of foods that go well with wine.
  3. And if you’re looking for even more experimental food and wine combinations, check out these sommeliers’ perspectives on Serious Eats.

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What kind of wine goes with General Tso chicken?

Red wines with a fruity and acidic profile, such as Zinfandel, Lambrusco, Beaujolais, or Pinot Noir, are the ideal accompaniments to General Tso’s Chicken. The sweetness of the General Tso’s Chicken is balanced out by the fruitiness of the red wine, while the acidity of the wine cuts through the thick sauce and the pieces of chicken that have been deep fried.

White wines that are dry and have a crisp taste, such as Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Sparkling wine, are excellent choices for combating the heat of General Tso’s sauce. To cut through the rich sauce that coats General Tso’s Chicken, you’ll need a wine that’s either red or white, but it should have a good deal of acidity.

Drink & Pair – Food & Wine Pairings on YouTube Drink & Pair – General Tso Chicken & Wine Pairing Watch later Share Copy link Info Shopping Tap to unmute If playing doesn’t begin quickly, try restarting your device.

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What kind of wine goes with soy sauce?

Wines That Go Well With Soy Sauce You Basically Have Two Options When It Comes to Pairing Wine With Soy Sauce: You Can Either Choose to Have Complementary or Congruent Flavors.

  • One option to create a complimentary combination is to match a sparkling Moscato or Brachetto d’Acqui with the dish in order to produce a “salty sweet” combo. When combined with soy-based meals, these wines provide a taste that is reminiscent of teriyaki, much in the same way that plum sauce or mirin would.
  • An approach that is coherent with matching would be to include more umami. Carignan-based wines from Languedoc-Roussillon such as Faugères, red blends from the Southern Rhône created with Grenache and Carignan, Cannonau (also known as Grenache) from Sardegna, or Aglianico de Vulture from Basilicata and Gaglioppo from Calabria are examples of umami wines. You’ll find that a congruent match like this one will actually make the wines taste more fruit forward, so keep that in mind as you experiment.

What kind of wine goes with General Tso chicken?

Red wines with a fruity and acidic profile, such as Zinfandel, Lambrusco, Beaujolais, or Pinot Noir, are the ideal accompaniments to General Tso’s Chicken. The sweetness of the General Tso’s Chicken is balanced out by the fruitiness of the red wine, while the acidity of the wine cuts through the thick sauce and the pieces of chicken that have been deep fried.

  • When it comes to white wines, dry and crisp wines like Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, and Sparkling wine are the best options for cooling down the heat of General Tso’s.
  • To cut through the rich sauce that coats General Tso’s Chicken, you’ll need a wine that’s either red or white, but it should have a good deal of acidity.

Drink & Pair – Food & Wine Pairings on YouTube Drink & Pair – General Tso Chicken & Wine Pairing Watch later Share Copy link Info Shopping Tap to unmute If playing doesn’t begin quickly, try restarting your device.

Can you drink red wine with chicken?

Chicken Roasting Pro Tip #6: There are few few dishes that can provide the same level of solace as a straightforward chicken roast. Choose a wine that is not too complex to avoid having it compete with the flavor of the dish. For example, a straightforward roasted chicken goes just as well with a full-flavored red wine as it would with a medium-bodied rosé or a bone-dry white wine.

What wine goes with sweet and sour chicken?

What Wine Goes With Chinese Food Quick quiz: what would you recommend eating alongside sweet and sour chicken? Keep in mind that this is a sweet meal with the acidity of pineapple, the characteristics of fried chicken, and some green vegetable qualities. When selecting a bottle of wine, each of these factors ought to be given careful consideration.

Riesling or similar medium-sweet white wine with good acidity would be an excellent choice. To complement this meal in particular, I would choose a German Spatlese Riesling and serve it relatively cold so that it may also function as a cleanser for the palate. Because it would complement the pineapple in this meal so well, I believe it would go wonderfully with it.

Because the dish has onion and bell pepper, the wine will have a fruitier flavor, like apricots, and will bring out the subtle beeswax-like characteristics that many German Rieslings have. Because of the sweetness and acidity in the sauce, most dry wines taste flat and sour when paired with sweet and sour sauce because the sweetness and acidity in the sauce makes dry wines taste flat and sour.

What wine goes well with kung pao chicken?

Alsace Pinot Gris is a wine that goes well with Kung Pao Chicken. Why It Works: Kung Pao sauce and wine can seem like an unlikely combination at first glance. In addition to being spicy, sweet, sour, and salty, it also has a little bit of fat. Pinot Gris from Alsace in France should be your first and only choice.